6 reasons we are thankful for Whychus Creek

Nov 25, 2014
It's the season for celebration and gratitude and this year we are especially thankful for Whychus Creek and the work that's being done to chart its future.


Thanksgiving is the time of year we gather with friends and family to celebrate and give thanks. At the Land Trust we are most thankful for YOU. It’s members, volunteers, and supporters like you who make it possible to conserve land in Central Oregon for today and tomorrow. This year we’re especially thankful for Whychus Creek and the groundbreaking work being done to chart its future.

Here are 6 reasons we are thankful for Whychus Creek:

1. Eight miles of Whychus Creek are protected forever.
The 
Land Trust has already conserved eight miles of Whychus Creek and 2,200 acres of its surrounding lands including the spectacular new addition to Whychus Canyon Preserve!  We are so grateful for the land we get to protect and the support that has made this conservation possible.

Whychus Creek at the addition to Whychus Canyon.
Whychus Creek at the addition to Whychus Canyon.
Whychus Creek at the addition to Whychus Canyon.
 

2. Salmon and steelhead are beginning to return to Whychus Creek for the first time in 50 years.
This is an important moment in Central Oregon’s history and we are grateful that places like Camp Polk Meadow Preserve can offer improved habitat for fish to spawn and return.

An iconic species makes its way back to Central Oregon.
An iconic species makes its way back to Central Oregon.
An iconic species makes its way back to Central Oregon.

3. Whychus Creek is fun to explore.
With several miles of trails at our protected lands alone, Whychus Creek is a great place to hike and enjoy the great outdoors. Land Trust hikes along Whychus Creek offer additional opportunities to learn about wildflowers, birds, geology, and history.

Whychus Canyon Preserve HIke. Photo by Tyler Roemer.
Whychus Canyon Preserve HIke. Photo by Tyler Roemer.
Whychus Canyon Preserve HIke. Photo by Tyler Roemer.

4. Lands along Whychus Creek like Camp Polk Meadow Preserve are birding hotspots.
These adorable great horned owlets were raised at Camp Polk Meadow. We’re thankful for bird sightings like these that make our days. 

Fuzzy owlets at Camp Polk Meadow Preserve. Photo By Kris Kristovich.
Fuzzy owlets at Camp Polk Meadow Preserve. Photo By Kris Kristovich.
Fuzzy owlets at Camp Polk Meadow Preserve. Photo By Kris Kristovich.

5. We are coming together to Speak for Whychus Creek.
As we envision and work towards a new future for Whychus Creek, we are so thankful for people like you who choose to share our work with others.

Speak for the Creek.
Speak for the Creek.
Speak for the Creek.
 

 

6. Our children will come to know Whychus Creek and our region’s scenic beauty as we do.
Whychus Creek is beautiful. It represents the iconic landscapes of Central Oregon as it flows from the Three Sisters peaks, past pine forests and lush meadows, and into desert canyons. Protecting land along Whychus Creek ensures that your children and grandchildren will get to enjoy them as we do.

Our kids will get to enjoy the creek as we do. Photo by Gary Miller.
Our kids will get to enjoy the creek as we do. Photo by Gary Miller.
Our kids will get to enjoy the creek as we do. Photo by Gary Miller.

Why are you grateful for Whychus Creek?