Suggested Routes at Land Trust Community Preserves

Ready to head out to a Land Trust Community Preserve, but not sure what to do once you get there? Take a look at our suggested routes.


You’ve got your snacks and water, put your shoes on, and are ready to hit the trails at your Deschutes Land Trust Community Preserves. But where should you go? What trails should you take? Look no further, we’ve got you covered! Here are some suggested routes for when you get out to our protected lands.

Visitors read an interpretive sign at Camp Polk Meadow Preserve. Photo: Dennis Jones.
Visitors read an interpretive sign at Camp Polk Meadow Preserve. Photo: Dennis Jones.
Camp Polk Meadow Preserve
Take a quiet moment at Camp Polk Meadow Preserve. Known for its excellent birding with more than 160 species observed, grab your binoculars or listen to the birdsong as you follow the short and flat gravel loop trail. Along the way, gaze at the notable Hindman barn and learn about the historical significance of the Preserve with interpretive signs. Then, see if you can spot the resident turkeys amongst the ponderosa pine stands.

Season: Camp Polk Meadow Preserve can be visited throughout the year. Enjoy spotting resident birds in the winter and migrating ones in the spring. Please note that roads into the Preserve and parking areas are not plowed in the winter.

Fido: Please note that dogs are not allowed at Camp Polk Meadow Preserve.

Driving Directions to Camp Polk Meadow Preserve

 

Visitors at Indian Ford Meadow Preserve. Photo: Kolby Kirk.
Visitors at Indian Ford Meadow Preserve. Photo: Kolby Kirk.
Indian Ford Meadow Preserve
Enjoy the scenic views at Indian Ford Meadow Preserve. Follow the one mile gravel and dirt trail through the ponderosa pines and into the meadow for outstanding views of the Three Sisters, Mt. Washington, Black Butte, Mt. Jefferson, and Indian Ford Creek. A viewpoint and bench lets you sit and take in all of the natural beauty.

Season: This trail can get muddy in the winter and spring, so check our website for trail conditions before heading out. Otherwise, Indian Ford Meadow Preserve is open throughout the year. Winter snow makes for a lovely, short cross country skiing or snowshoeing adventure. Please note that Preserve parking areas are not plowed, however. In the summer, bike parking at the entrance lets you make this a multi-sport journey.

Fido: Dogs must be kept on leash at Indian Ford Meadow Preserve. Please clean up after your pet and take plastic bags with you.

Driving Directions to Indian Ford Meadow Preserve

 

Enjoying the Metolius Preserve. Photo: Caitlin Eddolls.
Enjoying the Metolius Preserve. Photo: Caitlin Eddolls.
Metolius Preserve
The Metolius Preserve is a unique and beautiful blend of plants and wildlife habitat amongst the forests next to the Cascade mountains. Nestled within these lands are several miles of Lake Creek, the rare Peck’s penstemon, and beautiful western larch and vine maple trees. With two trailheads, make sure you have the right directions before you head out! Some suggested routes are the Larch Trail Loop, Metolius Preserve Grand Tour, and Fir Trail Loop. Learn more details about these routes.

Georeferenced Map: Download a georeferenced map of the Metolius Preserve to help with navigation.

Season: In the spring, trails can get muddy, so check our website for trail conditions before heading out. If trails are good, spring provides fresh green larch needles and spring wildflowers. In the summer, shady forests are a respite from the hot sun. Fall is a perfect time for the changing colors of larch, vine maples, and willows. Winter snow makes for wonderful cross country skiing or snowshoeing trips, but please note that roads into the Preserve and parking areas are not plowed.

Fido: Dogs must be kept on leash at the Metolius Preserve. Please clean up after your pet and take plastic bags with you.

Driving Directions for the South Trailhead and North Trailhead

 

Visitors at Whychus Canyon Preserve. Photo: Jill Rosell.
Visitors at Whychus Canyon Preserve. Photo: Jill Rosell.
Whychus Canyon Preserve
There is much to be explored at Whychus Canyon Preserve! With scenic viewpoints, the rushing cold waters of Whychus Creek, and the historic Santiam Wagon Road, you will have to make several trips to see everything. A few routes to get you started include the Wagon Road and Meadow Loop, the Long Canyon Route, and the Mid Canyon Route. Learn more details about these routes.

Georeferenced Map: Download a georeferenced map of Whychus Canyon Preserve to help with navigation.

Season: In the winter and spring, trails can get muddy, so check our website for trail conditions before heading out. Spring brings early season wildflowers like goldfields, sand lilies, and yellow bells. Summer can be hot with limited shade. Cooler fall temperatures and changing desert colors are welcoming. In the winter, Whychus Canyon Preserve is a great spot for hiking, as long as there hasn’t been recent snowfall. Please note that roads into the Preserve and parking areas are not plowed.

Fido: Dogs must be kept on leash at Whychus Canyon Preserve. Please clean up after your pet and take plastic bags with you.

Driving Directions to Whychus Canyon Preserve
 


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