Ranger report from the rim

May 31, 2017
I assumed the restoration would have an effect on the wildlife but I never expected it to happen so quickly or so profoundly. It’s been less than a year and already wildlife seems to be drawn to the area in increasing numbers.

by Mark Monteiro

Their names are Boo Boo and Sasquatch. At least, that’s what I call them.
 
For the last couple of weeks, watching these two baby birds (possibly swallows?) hatch, grow, and eventually leave the nest of their industrious mama has been one small but fascinating part of an amazing show taking place outside the windows of our home overlooking the recently restored Whychus Canyon Preserve.
 
My wife and I wake up every morning to a Disney-esque show featuring an endless parade of birds of all sizes, shapes, colors and personalities. There are also baby rabbits with bodies barely the size of an orange, families of quail marching about in single file, deer staring in our window while they graze and, perhaps most exciting of all, a squadron of about twelve turkey vultures regularly performing a WWII dog fight in the air currents above the canyon. Add the wildflowers, the quiet, and the beautiful weather, and it’s truly special.
 
We’ve seen all this before but never in such abundance.
 
Perhaps it’s just a coincidence but, this year, the quantity and diversity of the wildlife has been astonishing. Granted, as a guy who writes advertising for a living, I have no specific knowledge or scientific proof to back up anything I say but it seems to me that this wild proliferation of beauty must have something to do with the recent creek and meadow restoration of Whychus Canyon Preserve.
 
I assumed the restoration would have an effect on the wildlife but I never expected it to happen so quickly or so profoundly. It’s been less than a year and already wildlife seems to be drawn to the area in increasing numbers. If this is what can happen in less than a year, I think we all have a lot to look forward to.
 
For that we should be grateful to everyone to donated their time, money, passion and expertise to making the restoration happen. At a time when people can’t seem to come together about anything it’s inspiring to see a small reminder of what we can accomplish when diverse groups find a way to come together and make something beautiful happen.
 
Now I have to go. Boo Boo and Sasquatch are calling.

 

Mark Monterio is a neighbor of the Land Trust's Whychus Canyon Preserve.