Partnering for history

Apr 02, 2018
The Land Trust has a long history of working closely with local historical societies. But why do we partner with these groups who have a seemingly different purpose?


The Land Trust has a long history of working closely with local historical societies. Such was the case during a recent tour at Camp Polk Meadow Preserve. But why do we partner with these groups who have a seemingly different purpose?

Over the years, our historical partners have provided a great deal of tangible support for our conservation work. Whether they were helping us better steward our historic resources (such as the Hindman barn and homestead), develop historical interpretive signs at our Preserves, enrich our Walks + Hikes program, or gain important insights on plants and wildlife that once flourished, they have all made important contributions to the lands we protect.

But beyond these tangible benefits, the other reason the Land Trust partners with historical groups is fairly simple: our success in conserving land is greatly enhanced by a strong sense of community and a deep connection to place. Having partners who can tell the story of this place and connect us to our history is a big boost in our collective efforts to help Central Oregon grow thoughtfully.

Over the years, our partners have included the Oregon Historical Society, the Deschutes County Historical Society, the Crook County Historical Society/Bowman Museum, Jefferson County Historical Society, the Cultural Committee of the Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs and the Archeological Society of Central Oregon.  Most recently, we’ve seen the founding of two new groups, the Three Sisters Historical Society, based in Sisters and the new Redmond Historical Society. We look forward to working with these groups!