2020 Nature Night Series Announced

Jan 07, 2020
We hope you'll join us for our free, monthly presentations on nature-related topics, starting in January.


The Deschutes Land Trust announced today its winter Nature Nights series. From rivers to microplastics to traditional relationships with the land, the Land Trust is offering free, monthly presentations on nature-related topics given by experts in their field. Presentations include:

 

January 29: Long Memory of the Land
7:00-8:30 pm, The Tower Theatre in Bend

Photo: Provided.
Photo: Provided.

The Warm Springs, Wasco, and Paiute people live by the Unwritten Laws of their respective nations. Join Deschutes Land Trust and The Museum at Warm Springs Executive Director Elizabeth Woody to learn about some of the long-lived creeds and ceremonial codes the Warm Springs people hold in relation to the land. Elizabeth will share examples of Tiichám which describes the land, our earth, as the Long Memory of the land, including the understanding of a relationship from the Creator to the people. The Tiichám says, “the land is for you. This is the past, the present and the future.” It always was and always will be. She will also share the Twanat which says “you must follow the teachings on the land” and offer these creeds as a model for how we can all care for the land. This presentation is free, but you must get your ticket online.

 

February 26: The Dignity of Rivers
7:00-8:30 pm, The Tower Theatre in Bend

Photo: Provided.
Photo: Provided.

Every river, stream, and creek is unique and cannot be replaced by anything else. While rivers are a natural resource that provides a wide range of benefits, they are worth more to society than just their economic value. Join Deschutes Land Trust and river scientist Dr. Colin Thorne as we explore the dignity of rivers, or the innate right rivers have to be valued, respected, and to receive ethical treatment. Recently, rivers in India, New Zealand, Colombia, and Bangladesh have been granted the same legal rights as people. In a US context, this is a somewhat radical concept of the river, but a critical one. Colin proposes that the sustainability of our rivers will only be assured when the communities that surround and benefit from them choose to not only restore the functionality of their rivers, but also to respect the dignity of their rivers. This presentation is free and ticket sales open one month prior to the event.

 

March 31: A Closer Look at Microplastics
7:00-8:30 pm, The Tower Theatre in Bend

Photo: Provided.
Photo: Provided.

The large majority of plastic pollution, which is found in oceans, rivers and streams, and on land, is comprised of tiny particles and fibers smaller than five millimeters in size. It breaks down from larger plastic debris and is even shed from our clothing. Many of these microplastics are so small that they cannot be seen without a microscope. Join Deschutes Land Trust and Dr. Susanne Brander of Oregon State University to explore the tiny world of microplastics, including how these miniscule particles are detected and their potential effects on the natural world. Susanne will also offer ideas about what we can do to stem the plastic tide. This presentation is free and ticket sales open one month prior to the event.

Nature Nights are free, but a ticket is required. Please register online.