2014 Blog posts

The Crooked River Caldera

Our January Nature Night on the Crooked River Caldera was a full house! Enjoy slides from presenter Carrie Gordon on one of the largest ancient volcanoes in the world right here in Central Oregon.


Thanks to those of you who came out to our January 16th Nature Night on the Crooked River Caldera! It was a great presentation thanks go our fabulous presenter Carrie Gordon!

Enjoy slides from Carrie's presentation on one of the largest ancient volcanoes in the world right here in Central Oregon--the Crooked River Caldera.

If you have trouble viewing the slides below, click here.

2014 Nature Night: Crooked River Caldera by Carrie Gordon from DesLandTrust

Additional Resources mentioned during the presentation

Geology of Oregon
by Elizabeth L. Orr, and William N. Orr. Dubuque, IA: Kendall/Hunt Pub., 1999.

In Search of Ancient Oregon: A Geological and Natural History
by Ellen Morris Bishop. Portland, Or.: Timber, 2003.

Hiking Oregon's Geology
by Ellen Morris Bishop. Portland, Or.: Mountaineers Books, 2004.

Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries
. <http://www.oregongeology.org/sub/default.htm>

Carrie Gordon
is the Forest Geologist on the Ochoco National Forest and Crooked River National Grassland for the US. Forest Service. She holds a BA in Geology from Central Washington State College and is a Registered Geologist in the States of Oregon and Washington. Carrie has worked in Central Oregon since 1992 and was part of the team of geologists that discovered Central Oregon’s Crooked River Caldera. Carrie has had a life-long fascination with the land and the rocks, listening to the stories they tell.

***Thanks to North Rim, Lind/White Group at Merrill Lynch, and Arbor Mortgage for making Nature Nights possible.***

Central Oregon Wildflowers by Mark Turner

Our March Nature Night on Central Oregon Wildflowers with Mark Turner was the perfect way to celebrate the coming of spring. Check out the slides from Mark's presentation highlighting a wide variety of local wildflowers with his stunning photography.


Thanks to those of you who came out to our March Nature Night on Central Oregon Wildflowers! And thanks to Mark Turner for his excellent presentation!

Did you miss the name of an interesting flower? Or maybe you weren't able to make the presentation? We've got you covered. Here are the slides from Mark's presentation featuring the small to the showy wildflowers of Central Oregon in his stunning photography.

If you have trouble viewing the slides below, click here.

 
Mark Turner is a photographer and field guide author with a passion for wildflowers and other native plants. Mark is a native of West Virginia, where he began learning about wildflowers and photography as a boy. He still has his pressed flower collection from a 4-H project when he was in elementary school. Mark studied photography at Rochester Institute of Technology and is a self-taught botanist. He is an accomplished public speaker and has given programs for numerous garden clubs, native plant societies, and the Northwest Flower and Garden Show. In a perfect world he would spend most of his time during each growing season in the field photographing plants and their habitats.

***Thanks to North Rim, Lind/White Group at Merrill Lynch, and Arbor Mortgage for making Nature Nights possible.***

Attracting Native Pollinators by Mace Vaughan

Mace Vaughan from the Xerces Society presented our final Nature Night of 2014 on Attracting Native Pollinators. Check out the slides from his engaging presentation to learn more about native bees, the challenges they face, and how you can help.


Thanks to those of you who came out to our April Nature Night on Attracting Native Pollinators! And thanks to Mace Vaughan from the Xerces Society for his awesome presentation!

In case you missed it, below are slides from Mace's presentation. Flip through to learn more about native pollinators, the challenges they're facing, and how you can help bring back the bees!

If you have trouble viewing the slides below, click here.

 

Mace Vaughan is the Xerces Society Pollinator Conservation Program Director and Joint Pollinator Conservation Specialist to the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service’s West National Technology Support Center. Mace has written numerous articles on the conservation of bees and is co-author of Attracting Native Pollinators: Protecting North America’s Bees and Butterflies, as well as the Pollinator Conservation Handbook. He is the lead author of Farming for Bees: Guidelines for Providing Native Bee Habitat on Farms.


He was a lecturer on honey bee biology and beekeeping at Cornell University, from which he holds Masters Degrees in Entomology and Teaching. Mace has researched the behavior and community ecology of insects, and has worked as an insect wrangler and bee expert for PBS Nature.

 

***Thanks to North Rim, Lind/White Group at Merrill Lynch, and Arbor Mortgage for making Nature Nights possible.***

 

Why groundwater matters

Monitoring groundwater levels tells an important story as we work to restore the health of Whychus Creek and its surrounding meadows.


Back in October, the Land Trust announced that we protected an additional 480 acres and doubled the size of Whychus Canyon Preserve. This addition to Whychus Canyon Preserve contains about two miles of Whychus Creek and two large meadows that will become a central feature in upcoming restoration efforts.

To get a better understanding of the current ecological health of the property, we’ve worked with the Upper Deschutes Watershed Council to install groundwater monitoring wells. The wells were installed this year and will measure levels before, during, and after the Whychus Creek restoration.

A meandering stream slows water, stores groundwater, and creates a lush meadow. Illustration: Restoration Design Group.
A meandering stream slows water, stores groundwater, and creates a lush meadow. Illustration: Restoration Design Group.

What is groundwater?

Groundwater is the water found underground in the cracks and spaces in soil, sand, and rock.

Why does groundwater matter?
Besides providing an important source of drinking water, groundwater helps regulate the temperature of creeks and rivers for plants, fish and wildlife. In warm summer months when streams are low, groundwater is naturally released into creeks and helps cool waters to keep them at a healthy temperature for fish. Groundwater at places like Whychus Canyon Preserve will play an important role in helping returning steelhead and salmon thrive in Whychus Creek.

A straightened stream leads to depleted groundwater levels and creates an unhealthy meadow. Drawing: Restoration Design Group.
A straightened stream leads to depleted groundwater levels and creates an unhealthy meadow. Drawing: Restoration Design Group.

One of the main goals of the restoration of Whychus Creek at Camp Polk Meadow Preserve was to increase groundwater levels. Since the restoration, groundwater levels have risen by more than two feet. This indicates a healthier meadow and happier Whychus Creek where fish, birds, and other wildlife can flourish. The new addition to Whychus Canyon Preserve will also see a major restoration of Whychus Creek and it will be interesting to see how groundwater levels change there.

How do the groundwater wells work?
Groundwater wells are simply PVC pipes that are drilled into the ground. Once the pipe is in place, we can measure the distance of the groundwater from the ground's surface and track how that measurement changes over time.

Measuring groundwater in these initial years before the Whychus Creek restoration begins is an important step in establishing baseline water levels. We are especially interested in groundwater measurements during the growing season, which will help us choose appropriate plants for restoration projects. As we work to restore Whychus Creek, these wells will also help us see how our work effects the groundwater and surrounding meadows and creek.


http://www.deschuteslandtrust.org/news/blog/2014-blog-posts/how-dangerous-are-rattlesnakes

The link address is: explore/co-rattlesnakes

http://www.deschuteslandtrust.org/news/blog/2014-blog-posts/top-12-places-for-fall-color-in-central-oregon

http://www.deschuteslandtrust.org/news/blog/2014-blog-posts/pygmy-short-horned-lizard